Category Archives: Beyond Cancer

The first day of school, my 6 month scans

Yesterday was a strange day. The sun was shining. Still feels like summer. It was Saul and Lev’s official first day of school: Lev to kindergarten, Saul to second grade. I mentioned in an earlier post that we’ve moved across the bridge to Piedmont. So we’re in a new home, a new school district and all is well.

Except that I also had my 6 month scans in that familiar trailer. The juxtaposition of normal/happy life with this disease is almost overwhelming. In the morning I was chatting with the other parents and sharing excitement about the school year, logistics about after school programs, enthusiasm about our teachers. Hours later, instead of picking the kids up from school, I was getting injected with radioactive isotopes. I sat quietly, doing my best to still the mind from the swirl of future-oriented thoughts. Not much else to do. The timing just worked out that way and I don’t really feel like changing it.

Oddly, the familiarity of this position seems like a kind of home base. As much as I hate this process, my relationship to it isn’t antagonistic. I know that if my results are bad that I’m prepared to fight. I’ve done it, frankly at this point it’s a part of my identity. Actually this state of purgatory is the most anxiety-provoking. I can tell its been affecting me, thought I don’t like to admit it. And my thoughts go out to the millions of folks that need to deal with this on a regular basis. It’s excruciating. I do my best not to let it control me but it’s clear there’s background anxiety eating up cycles.

I did a hypnosis session the other day with a friend who is getting certified in it (she’s a top notch psychologist in her own right and taking on new skills). It was actually quite powerful, not because she put a spell on me or anything like that, but rather she enabled me to go deep into my own memory banks with skillful guided imagery; helping me pull dusty memories from forgotten shelves. One observation that stuck with me, largely because it was visceral/kinesthetic, in which I imagined some challenging times in high-school. I thought about the anxiety certain situations provoked. And the incredible part was that I felt that emotion manifest in my abdomen, around the location of the tumor. I don’t think I’m reading into it but there is a connection there worth exploring. It’s an interesting practice.

All of which is to say these appointments, this whole process, serves as a reminder. I find value in it. I’m forcing myself to but I also deeply believe it. We are mortal and fragile beings. So are our loved ones. It’s easy to forget or it would probably occupy all our thoughts (we would not get much done). And so I don’t see this as a diminishment of my experience but rather as an enhancement. It adds value to my life in the form of imparting gratitude and helping me get present. Value is a function of perception.

I’m not sure the right way to approach this whole process. What I know for certain is that what matters is extreme honesty in going through this. It’s scary. I’ll deal with what comes. And I can’t sugar coat any of it.

Should get results today or tomorrow.

Schrodinger’s CT

That’s not a typo. I have my 6 month PET/CT scan coming up next week. I find myself existing in two simultaneous mental states: in remission or recurrence? Am I healthy? I told my doctor to get it scheduled asap. As much as I want to put this off (I really do) there’s really no sense in doing so. I need to face this thing head on. Thanks for the nudge to just do it Eli!

Last weekend I flew to Colorado to visit my brother Eli. We made good on a promise before my surgery in December to go camping when the ordeal was over. We climbed a 14k mountain, starting the day at 4:45am (ok, we started at 11.5k, but still!). It was great. He has a camper van that we slept in by the side of the road. I was pleased that there were no issues to report. This felt extra great given that I got altitude sickness going to Tahoe just a few months prior. So I’m feeling healthy.

Next week we’ll open the box and find out what the CT scan has to say.

Precious Cargo

What a shame to not fully bloom. Fear, apprehension, self-doubt cripple us. And they are an insult to our unique gifts. Because that part that wants to express is true, good and should live (even if the output is imperfect!).

Remember the morning demon that demands your review of the future day. It asks: would repeating this day be joyous, or miserable? That seems as good a scorecard as any in deciding what good one will make of the day.

Our days take on a rhythm. That rhythm might be inertia, based on days past. It might be twisted into a pretzel by the school or business culture. Or maybe it’s the rhythm of no rhythm, each day totally novel to bash routine. The day might be filled with wonder, or with trepidation. But whatever it is know that you have the space to change it if it’s not working. If it’s squelching the gift. Will you do it intentionally, or reflexively? Perhaps a set of rules would help.

  • if lethargic then walk
  • if overwhelmed then belly breathe for 1 minute
  • if indecisive then get action
  • ….

There’s an African proverb I heard from Jack Kornfield (a well known Buddhist teacher) in a talk he gave a few months ago:

Children are born with a precious cargo. It’s the job of a parent to help them deliver it.

The blockers to ensuring this happens are many, individual as fingerprints. But underneath most of them is a dampening of enthusiasm. How might we ensure that self-doubt, the (likely imagined) judgments of others, or anything else doesn’t creep into their psyches? Can you hear the brakes screeching?

If you’re a parent (even if you aren’t), try not to forget that you too are a child with cargo that needs delivering. A good way to ensure children can get there is to show them how. Let’s model that delivery process.

The path isn’t always this straight (taken in Whitefish, Montana)

A year since I was diagnosed

Here’s a quick update since it’s been a while and I’m getting the itch to write again.

There have been quite a few (great!) changes lately: I’m back at work; we moved the family to the east bay; kids are thriving. But I’ve also been feeling some uncharacteristic anxiety lately. I was attributing it to ‘life’, then it occurred to me that while all that is true the underlying reason is it’s an anniversary – a year since I was diagnosed (cancer is murky and these timelines are approximate; I had symptoms July 4 vacation then started chemo on 8/8). So this time last year I was going through a battery of scary tests to figure out what was going on. I have visceral memories of the uncertainty of it all. While I’m overall feeling quite excellent physically I do find myself often checking my abdomen, feeling for growth. Is that a lump? Am I cured? Am I fooling myself? The pangs of anxiety are good reminders not to take things for granted. This is a marathon involving both psyche and physique. These are not in equal proportion – for me at least the former is much more demanding. 

The thing that really stands out in reflecting back on the year is my support network. This was my unfair advantage over the disease: friends, family, colleagues, even strangers. I well up with gratitude and consider myself among the most fortunate men alive.

So if you’re reading this, thank you. 

3 buckyballs
Thank you!